Conclusions of a research paper are the point at which ideas are concluded and the reader is left with a strong final impression. It has several key objectives:

  • Rethink the research problem addressed in the work.
  • Summarize the overall arguments or results
  • Suggest the main conclusions of the work.

The content of the conclusion varies depending on whether the work presents the results of original empirical research or constructs an argument through engagement with sources.

Steps to develop effective conclusions

The steps below show how to draw an effective conclusion for either type of research paper.

Step 1: Remind the reader of the research problem

You'll have discussed this issue in depth throughout the body of the article, but now it's about moving from the details to the big picture.

While it is true that you are repeating a problem that you have already introduced, you should avoid writing it identically to how it appeared in the introduction. The ideal is to find a novel way to return to the problem from the more detailed ideas that are exposed in the body.

For example, an argumentative document advocating new measures to reduce the environmental impact of agriculture could reframe its problem as follows:

Despite the fact that the role of livestock in climate change is already in the public domain, countries such as the Netherlands still do not address this issue with the urgency it deserves.

For its part, an empirical article that studies the relationship of the use of Instagram with body image problems could present its problem like this:

As social media becomes increasingly central to young people's daily lives, it's important to understand how different platforms affect their developing self-concept.

"In conclusion..."

Avoid starting your conclusion with phrases like "In conclusion" or "To conclude". It can be too obvious and make your writing seem unsophisticated. The content and location of the conclusion should make its function clear without the need for additional signage.

Step 2: Summarize the document

Once you've focused on the problem, it's time to summarize how the body of work has been approached and what conclusions this approach has led to.

Depending on the nature of the research work, this may mean re-exposing the thesis and arguments. Even summarize the overall results.

Argumentative document: Reiterating the thesis and arguments

In an argumentative work, you will have presented a thesis in the introduction. Here you will express the general statement that defends your work. In the conclusion, you must reaffirm the thesis and show how it has developed throughout the text.

Briefly summarize the main arguments presented in the body of the article, showing how each of them contributes to proving their thesis. You can also mention the counterarguments you've addressed. You should highlight why your thesis holds up against them, especially if your argument is controversial.

Don't go into the details of your tests or come up with new ideas. Focus on outlining out the argument you've made.

Summary of the argumentative document

The evidence is clear. In order to create an agricultural sector that is truly future-ready, Dutch farmers must be encouraged to move from livestock farming to sustainable plant farming. In addition to drastically reducing emissions, plant agriculture, if approached correctly, can produce more food with less land, providing opportunities for nature's regeneration areas that in turn will contribute to climate goals. While this approach would have economic ramifications, from a long-term perspective, it would represent an important step towards a more sustainable and resilient national economy.

Empirical paper: Summarize your findings

In an empirical paper, this is the time to summarize the main conclusions. Don't go into great detail (you'll have already presented your results in depth and the discussion). Clearly state the answers to the research questions you've researched.

Describe your main findings, even if they aren't necessarily the ones you expected or wanted. Explain the general conclusion you've been led to.

Summary of empirical work

By looking at the effect of daily Instagram use among teens, this study established that highly visual social media effectively has a significant effect on body image concerns. It has a strong correlation between the amount of time spent on the platform and the participants' self-declared dissatisfaction with their appearance.

However, the strength of this effect was moderated by pre-test self-esteem indices. Participants with higher self-esteem were less likely to experience increased concern for their body image after using Instagram. This suggests that while Instagram influences body image, it's also important to consider the broader social and psychological context in which this use occurs. Teens who are already predisposed to self-esteem issues may have an increased risk of experiencing negative effects.

Step 3: Discuss the implications

Once the main arguments or findings have been summarized, the conclusion concludes by considering the broader implications of the research. This means expressing the main conclusions, practical or theoretical, of the work, often in the form of a call to action or suggestions for future research.

Argumentative paper: A solid conclusion

An argumentative article usually ends with a strong final statement. In the case of a practical argument, make a call to action: What actions do you think affected individuals or organizations should take in response to your argument?

Call to action

The transition to sustainable vegetable farming will make the Netherlands greener and healthier, setting an example to other European governments. Farmers, policy-makers and consumers must focus on the future, not just their own short-term interests, and work to make this transition now.

If your topic is more theoretical and does not lend itself to a call to action, your final statement should express the importance of your argument, for example, by proposing a new understanding of a topic or laying the groundwork for future research.

Empirical paper: Future research directions

In a more empirical paper, you can conclude by making recommendations for practice. For example, in clinical or policy papers) or suggesting directions for future research.

Whatever the scope of your own research, there will always be room to continue researching related topics. You will often discover new questions and problems during the research process.

End your article with a futures note suggesting how you or other researchers might develop this topic in the future and address any limitations of the current article.

Future research directions

Future research on Instagram and other highly visual social media should focus on establishing a clearer picture of how self-esteem and related constructs influence young people's experiences on these platforms. In addition, although this experiment measured Instagram usage in terms of time spent on the platform, observational studies are required to learn more about the different usage patterns. This can be investigated, for example, whether active publishing is associated with different effects than passive consumption of social media content.

Examples of research findings

The following are full examples of research findings. One for an argumentative work and one for an empirical work.

Conclusions of an argumentative work

Although the role of livestock in climate change is already in the public domain, countries such as the Netherlands still do not address this issue with the urgency it deserves. The evidence is clear: in order to create an agricultural sector that is truly future-ready, Dutch farmers must be encouraged to move from livestock farming to sustainable plant farming.

In addition to drastically reducing emissions, plant agriculture, if approached correctly, can produce more food with less land. It thus provides opportunities for areas of nature regeneration which in turn will contribute to climate objectives. While this approach would have economic ramifications, from a long-term perspective, it would represent an important step towards a more sustainable and resilient national economy. The transition to sustainable vegetable farming will make the Netherlands greener and healthier, setting an example to other European governments. Farmers, policymakers and consumers must focus on the future, not just their own short-term interests, and work to implement this transition now.

Conclusions of the empirical paper

As social media becomes an increasingly important element in young people's daily lives, it's important to understand how different platforms affect their developing self-concept. By looking at the effect of daily Instagram use among teens, this study established that highly visual social media effectively has a significant effect on body image concerns. It has a strong correlation between the amount of time spent on the platform and the participants' self-declared dissatisfaction with their appearance.

However, the strength of this effect was moderated by pre-test self-esteem indices. Participants with higher self-esteem were less likely to experience increased concern for their body image after using Instagram. This suggests that while Instagram influences body image, it's also important to consider the broader social and psychological context in which this use occurs. Teens who are already predisposed to self-esteem issues may be at greater risk of experiencing negative effects.

Future research on Instagram and other highly visual social networks should focus on establishing a clearer picture of how self-esteem and related constructs influence young people's experiences on these platforms. In addition, while this experiment measured Instagram usage in terms of time spent on the platform, observational studies are required to learn more about different usage patterns, to investigate, for example, whether active publishing is associated with different effects than passive consumption of social media content.

Our specialists wait for you to contact them through the quote form or direct chat. We also have confidential communication channels such as WhatsApp and Messenger. And if you want to be aware of our innovative services and the different advantages of hiring us, follow us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.

If this article was to your liking, do not forget to share it on your social networks.

Also you might be interested in: Antithesis

Bibliographic References

Crawford, E. T. (1973). The sociology of the social sciences: a trend report and bibliography. The Hague ; Paris: Mouton, 1973.

Dogan, M and Pahre, R. (1990). 'The fate of formal disciplines: from coherence to dispersion'. In Creative marginality: innovation at the intersections of social sciences. Boulder, CO: Westview. Pp. 85-113.

Whitley, R. (2000). The Intellectual and Social Organisation of the Sciences, 2nd. ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Conclusions of the Investigation

Conclusions of the Investigation

Abrir chat
1
Bienvenido(a) a Online Tesis
Nuestros expertos estarán encantados de ayudarte con tu investigación ¡Contáctanos!